Sunday, February 11, 2018

Utah: House Passes Bill Criminalizing Assisted Suicide

Rep Michael McKell
Jessica Miller, The Salt Lake Tribune 

The Utah House passed a bill Tuesday that would criminalize helping someone commit suicide — despite some concern from lawmakers that the bill could unintentionally target physicians or family members of terminally ill patients.

Rep. Michael McKell, R-Spanish Fork, has sponsored House Bill 86, which would amend Utah’s manslaughter statute to include assisted suicide. This means a person would be guilty of a second-degree felony — which is punishable by up to 15 years in prison — if prosecutors can prove he or she provided “the physical means” for someone to commit suicide.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Mere Thought or Intention Is Good Enough for Touted Safeguards

By Margaret Dore, Esq., MBA

Hawaii Bill HB 2739 seeks to legalize assisted suicide and euthanasia as those terms are traditionally defined. The bill also promotes itself as having “robust" safeguards.[1] Indeed, the bill goes so far as to say that its "rigorous safeguards would be the strongest of any state in the nation and will thoroughly protect patients and their loved ones from any potential abuse."[2]

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Update: Prescribe or Refer: No More Jeanette Halls

Margaret Dore, Esq., MBA
By Margaret Dore Esq., MBA

A Wisconsin bill seeking to legalize assisted suicide, requires the patient's attending physician to "prescribe or refer" i.e., to write a lethal prescription for the purpose of killing the patient, 
or to make an effective referral to another physician, who will do it.

The bill, AB 216, also says that the attending physician's failure to comply is "unprofessional conduct" such that the physician would be subject to discipline. The bill states:
[F]ailure of an attending physician to fulfill a request for medication [the lethal dose] constitutes unprofessional conduct if the attending physician refuses or fails to make a good faith attempt to transfer the requester's care and treatment to another physician who will act as attending physician under this chapter and fulfill the request for medication. (Emphasis added).*
A significance of prescribe or refer is that it's anti-patient, by not allowing doctors to use their best judgment for individual patients.


Monday, January 29, 2018

Vermont Report on Assisted Suicide (and Euthanasia)

From True Dignity Vermont

On January 15, 2018, the Vermont Department of Health presented its first report to the legislature and public on the implementation of the state’s physician assisted suicide [and euthanasia] law.  The legislature had passed the law, Act 39, in 2013 and replaced it in 2015 with Act 27, which maintains Act 39 under “Oregon-style” regulations, including a requirement for biennial reporting.

The law has been in effect for four years, and the current report covers all of them.

Friday, January 26, 2018

Join Us For An Exciting Event



Saturday March 3rd, 2018
Doors Open 12:00pm  | Event 12:30pm

One hour debate followed by 15 minute Q&A
Complimentary Refreshments

Tickets are $10
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/euthanasia-or-aid-in-dying-you-decide-tickets-41520189003

Hofstra University Club, 225 Hofstra Blvd, Hempstead, NY 11550

To print an event flyer Click Here

For more information: 631-487-7578

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Delaware: Death Certificate Falsification Requires Opposition to HB 160

Kirk Allison, PhD
Dear Legislators:

I directed the Program in Human Rights and Health at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health from 2006-2016 and am a past chair of the American Public Health Association's Ethics Special Primary Interest Group (now Ethics Section).

While working on my dissertation I was a visiting preceptor (research rotation) at the Hennepin County (Minnesota) Medical Examiner's Office. It was greatly impressed upon me the need for scientific accuracy in the medico-legal documentations of death.